VTOL

VTOL

VTOL

Vertical Take-Off and Landing, used to classify an aircraft which can use engine power to take off vertically and land vertically from a hover. Very few jet combat aircraft can do this, the most famous being the British Harrier Jump Jet. Even this aircraft cannot take off vertically with anything but a very light bombload.

The Many, Many Benefits of VTOL Aircraft

Have you ever wondered how you get an aircraft to land in busy urban centers, hospital helipads, or on any other small surface? Indeed, planes that can achieve this are very much in demand. These types of planes are called VTOL aircraft.

VTOL means vertical take-off and landing and these types of aircraft consist of vehicles that are able to take off, hover, and land vertically, eliminating the need for runways. This means they can go places they are much needed in and where regular planes simply cannot land or take off from.

VTOL aircraft have a long history dating all the way back to Leonardo da Vinci. However, the first vehicle to make a crewed vertical ascent was the Cornu, an early helicopter that first flew in 1907.

VTOL aircraft are marvels of engineering that make it possible to achieve everything from organ transplant delivery to hospitals to moving humans in gurneys for surgery. VTOL aircraft may someday also become air taxis. Indeed, the applications of these aircraft are many and varied.

Can you think of a place where a VTOL aircraft might be useful? Watch our video to see if any of the different kinds of VTOL aircraft showcased to inspire you.


The Jump-Jet Airliner and the VTOL Future of Flight That Never Took Off

Japan seeks to join the vertical takeoff club with a novel lift-fan design.

In the June 1993 issue, Popular Mechanics reported on the beginning of commercial aviation flirting with the idea of VTOL technology. Already on display in military aircraft like the Osprey-22, VTOL aircraft could theoretically eliminate the need for runways and run quieter than your typical airliner. The National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) in Toyko began testing prototypes that would bring VTOL tech to an airport near you, leading to, what they believed, would be a "worldwide revolution in commercial aviation." If you've flown on a plane recently, you already know this future never took flight.

You are an aircraft designer. Your assignment is to devise the next-generation passenger transport. Specifications call for a capacity of 100 passengers, a top speed of Mach 0.8, a range of 1,600 miles and an operational ceiling in excess of 32,000 ft. Your aircraft must be reliable, very comfortable, and quiet enough to meet increasingly stringent noise regulations. Finally, your aircraft must be sufficiently economical to compete head-to-head with the commercial airliners now in service.

Oh, yes&mdashone last thing. Your aircraft must be capable of taking off and landing vertically from an unprepared site no more than 200 sq. meters in size&mdasha tiny fraction of a conventional airport runway.

If you're stumped, you're not the only one. For decades, designers in this country and abroad have been engaged in an on-again, off-again effort to develop just such a machine&mdasha commercially viable aircraft that combines the short-hop virtuosity of a helicopter with the speed, economy, and comfort of a fixed-wing jet aircraft. In other words, the Holy Grail of commercial aviation.

Yet, despite numerous promising designs, as well as a handful of prototypes and production models (most notably the Bell/Boeing V-22 Osprey now being tested for the U.S. Armed Forces), most existing and proposed VTOL aircraft have been prop-driven machines&mdashtilt-rotors, tilt-wings and other aircraft designed for short hauls, small payloads and low speeds. Fine aircraft, in many cases, but lacking the specs to compete with other modes of intercity transportation.

If, on the other hand, you've got a few good ideas, there may be a job waiting for you in Tokyo. There, aviation designers from the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) are working to create just such an aircraft. This proposed VTOL aircraft represents more than an ambitious early step into novel aircraft technology. Masanori Endoh, head of NAL's VTOL development program, says the aircraft will spark a worldwide revolution in commercial aviation.

"We must build this big VTOL aircraft as soon as possible," says Endoh, "because it will open the horizon for a new air-transport network suitable for the 21st century. Once we build it, we will no longer need conventional airports."

Endoh's aircraft isn't on the tarmac quite yet. Several hurdles remain uncrossed: ever-tightening government R&D budgets and certain design challenges, including development of a powerful and reliable lift fan. Moreover, even in the rosiest scenario presented by Endoh, the first flight of the finished VTOL prototype won't come for another decade, at least. But there is reason for optimism. According to Endoh, preliminary studies of the proposed aircraft's propulsion system, as well as computer analysis and wind-tunnel testing of its airframe, suggest that the NAL aircraft will meet all the criteria outlined above.

It doesn't take an aeronautical genius to appreciate the appeal of a VTOL transport. Just ask any hapless traveler who has fought heavy traffic on the road to and from distant airports, or awaited takeoff on a packed runway.

Urban planners have traditionally tried to reduce such delays by adding new infrastructure&mdashmore runways, bigger terminals and higher-capacity highways around existing airports. But new construction of this type seldom provides more than temporary relief. In addition, the clearing of wooded areas and pouring of new concrete become less and less attractive as competition grows for land in crowded metropolitan areas. Already this approach is altogether impractical in a country like Japan, where small size, mountainous terrain and high population density render new infrastructure especially undesirable. Hence, it's no surprise to aviation experts that VTOL transports will likely first appear in Asia.

The Japanese designers hope to shorten air-travel delays by concentrating on new hardware rather than new infrastructure that is, not by boosting access to centralized airports, but by building a new class of aircraft capable of flying out of tiny decentralized airports located only a short walk from downtown districts. In the United States, the Federal Aviation Administration has already commissioned vertiport feasibility studies for 15 different cities.

The cost of flying on the proposed VTOL aircraft remains uncertain. Endoh predicts a ticket price 20 percent higher than that for flying on a conventional airliner. Other aviation experts aren't quite as sanguine. Says one, the cost will be so high initially that the aircraft's only users will be wealthy tourists and companies shipping high-value cargo. However, he says, prices should soon drop to competitive levels.

As presently envisioned, the NAL VTOL transport would employ a narrow, tailless airframe, with twin canards sprouting from the fuselage just aft of the cockpit and narrow, dramatically swept wings set far aft. In place of a conventional tail, the design calls for winglets shaped alike but proportionally much larger than those found on some existing airliners. The aircraft, equipped throughout with advanced fly-by-wire technology, would be approximately 100 ft. long, with a wingspan of 79 ft.

This unusual configuration helps ensure stability, especially during low-speed and vertical operation when the absence of horizontal airspeed renders control surfaces ineffective.

"We tried many shapes," recalls Endoh. &ldquoHowever, to reduce the danger of uncontrolled roll, pitch and yaw, we had to make sure the center of gravity was on the lift engines. That left us with just one possible design."

For reduced weight and increased rigidity, the NAL team plans to fashion virtually all elements of the structure-including fan blades and engine components&mdashfrom ultralight carbon-fiber composites.

The aircraft would be powered by a unique system employing lift and cruise fans powered by a trio of aft-mounted turbine powerplants. For forward thrust, high-pressure bleed air tapped from the compressors of these three "core" engines would be routed to twin, 7-ft. cruise fans. At the center of each fan, is a combustor where fuel would mix with the bleed air and ignite. The expanding gases would spin a turbine linked to the fan by a reduction gear, producing 24,000 pounds of thrust per side.

"To reduce the danger of uncontrolled roll, pitch and yaw, we had to make sure the center of gravity was on the lift engines. That left us with just one possible design."

During vertical takeoff and landing, bleed air would be ducted to six 8-ft. rotors encased within the wings and shielded on both upper and lower wing surfaces by controllable louvers. Collectively, these 200-blade rotors&mdasheach molded from a single piece of carbon fiber and each fitted with its own combustor, turbine, and reduction gear&mdashwould generate in excess of 130,000 pounds of thrust.

Perhaps surprisingly, the lift fans should not be especially noisy.

&ldquoBecause the fan speed is very low, and because the sound produced by the one-piece fan mechanism will be extremely high-pitched," predicts Endoh, "our aircraft will be quieter than a conventional helicopter. However, just to make sure, we will use sound-absorbing liners inside the louvers. It will cause no environmental problem."

As the craft rises, the louvers work in tandem with several small low-pressure bleed air jets positioned at several points along the fuselage to maximize low-speed maneuverability and stability. To facilitate the transition from vertical to horizontal flight, the pilot gradually redirects bleed air from the rotors to the cruise fans, simultaneously closing the louvers to seal off the rotors. Closing the louvers boosts the wings' effective surface area, thereby increasing aerodynamic lift. (In fact, the pilot can easily seal off the louvers and get the aircraft airborne using a conventional rolling takeoff.)


Vertical Take-Off and Landing

Vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft include fixed-wing aircraft that can hover, take off and land vertically, as well as helicopters and other aircraft with powered rotors, such as tiltrotors. Some VTOL aircraft can operate in other modes as well, such as CTOL (conventional takeoff and landing), STOL (short takeoff and landing), and/or STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing). Others, such as some helicopters, can only operate by VTOL, due to the aircraft lacking landing gear that can handle horizontal motion.

To take off or land vertically, the powerful exhaust streams from a jet engine can be directed downward as well as backward, and their direction can be changed in mid-flight. This allows fixed-wing aircraft, such as the Harrier or the F-35B, to take off vertically, fly forward, stop in mid-air, back up, and land vertically. They can also take off and land like a normal airplane. A helicopter’s spinning blades create thrust like a large propeller, but the thrust is directed vertically. This allows the vehicle to take off and land vertically and to hover. To move forward, the helicopter tilts slightly to direct some of its thrust forward.

A tiltrotor is an aircraft that uses a pair tiltrotors mounted on rotating engines at the end of a fixed wing to generate vertical and horizontal thrust. It combines the vertical capability of a helicopter with the speed and range of a fixed-wing aircraft. For vertical flight, the rotors are angled so the plane of rotation is horizontal, like a helicopter. As the aircraft gains speed, the rotors are tilted forward, with the plane of rotation eventually becoming vertical. The wing then provides lift, and the rotor provides thrust like a propeller.


VTOL Takes Off

Vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) concepts for unmanned aerial systems (UAS) certainly aren’t new. Their reconnaissance and intelligence-gathering roles date back to the 1950s, and there’s been a gradual path toward technological advancements in the decades since.

But one need look no further than the infamous vertical and/or short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) Wheel of Misfortune —which visually depicts the many concepts that have stumbled or failed over the years—to see the challenge.

That said, the potential advantages of next-generation VTOL drones for the modern-day battlefield are becoming increasingly attractive. UAS of this type are a dream for a mobile military, reducing fixed-wing launch and recovery challenges while freeing troops from stationary runway constraints.

Additionally, emerging mission objectives across the various service branches underscore the need for low-footprint solutions that reduce weight and cost while increasing performance and safety. The Army’s desire for better acoustics and runway independence when replacing its RQ-7 Shadow tactical UAS, the U.S. Air Force’s exploration of resupply solutions and the Pentagon’s plans to leverage commercial R&D in the VTOL space are just some indicators around implementing the airframe in the defense space like never before.

Simply put, while the challenges of the past remain, there are indications that revolutionary new designs in development today have the potential to fulfill missions in ways traditional airframes simply can’t. What’s more, it’s sparking an unprecedented era of collaboration and innovation.

Drone companies and manufacturers alike are working across industries to rapidly accelerate their VTOL systems for military and even civilian applications—not just to meet the needs of the combat missions of the future, but also the needs of the world at large.

VTOL ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES

One individual keeping a close eye on VTOL trends within the military space is David Arterburn, a UAS expert and director of the Rotorcraft System Engineering and Simulation Center at the University of Alabama, Huntsville.

As a retired Army aviator who’s spent years conducting flight tests on automated approaches such as fly by wire, Arterburn can quickly run through a checklist of VTOL airframe advantages: they’re flexible and more maneuverable than fixed-wing aircraft, require less space to launch and recover, are runway independent and lower the overall cost of operations, to name a few.

The advantages of vertical lift, however, can be offset by some key challenges, such as poor efficiency, payload limitations and low endurance. VTOL systems use rotors to generate lift and thrust, requiring more power compared to fixed-wing aircraft, which only require a propulsion system, as lift is generated by its wings.

“The most efficient vertical landing platform is a single rotor helicopter, but that’s also the most fragile system because one defect in that rotor can become a catastrophic failure,” Arterburn noted. “That said, we’re seeing designs in the future vertical lift community to make VTOL more capable than it’s ever been.”

Whether these designs can meet their reliability targets to guarantee safety, and whether the battery technology will be enough to achieve ranges and affordability targets are still open questions, he explained.

But Arterburn believes a surge in urban air mobility efforts and the emergence of hundreds of proposed air taxi designs are really starting to push the envelope with respect to VTOL due to their need to be both quiet and efficient with a reasonable amount of range and capacity.

It’s also resulting in an unprecedented interplay between defense and commercial industries.

“If you look back at the early 1950s and ’ 60s, the military and NASA would build first and the commercial industry would then commercialize different defense technologies. Now it’s happening very much in reverse,” he said.

“Vertical lift is going to evolve at all scales into a more capable force as the need for runways and fixed operations diminishes, and we’ll be able to operate from remote sites more effectively and for longer periods of time. A lot of that’s just evolving and it’s becoming very interesting to watch.”


The VTOL is used by J-SOC and the PLA during the campaign. The VTOL is used as air support with a minigun operated by J-SOC Operator Chavez on the side during the Arctic Campaign and is also used by PLA Operator Xiao to provide overwatch and sniper support during the Asian Campaign.

Used by

Weapons

Data Vault

VTOLs are the standard workhorse aircraft in modern military usage today. There are a number of variants deployed by different factions, provided by different manufacturers.

Different vehicles have different internal layouts some intended as troops transports - others intended as mobile command facilities.

A number of different weapon load outs are available for these vehicles, but their limited agility favors standoff and over-horizon weapon types.

Overview

Service history

  • Type: Combat Support Aircraft
  • Place of origin: Various
  • In service: 2038-present
  • Used by: Winslow Accord, CDP, Assorted unaligned powers

Specifications (Approximate Average)

  • Weight: 14 tons unloaded 23 tons loaded max takeoff weight is 28 tons
  • Length: 15.5 meters
  • Width: 23.4 meters
  • Height: 4.5 meters
  • Crew: 2
  • Passengers: 2 to 32 (dependent on internal configuration)
  • Armor: Ceramic composite plate
  • Active defenses: Active ECM countermeasures local kW-class directed energy anti-projectile defense systems
  • Engine: Twin wing-mounted ducted turbofans

The "boxy" variant pictured in the infobox seems to be mainly used by the Common Defense Pact and its allies. It has retractable landing wheels, a single-barrelled chin-mounted autocannon, a nose mounted sensor pod and six large missiles per wing. It was designed by Tony Kwok for the Nile River Coalition. ΐ] Another variant can also be seen in some campaign missions and as an environmental asset on certain multiplayer maps. This version is sleeker, with less missiles on the wings, is black in colouration, has three retractable landing skids on the belly and possesses a chin mounted tri-barrelled traversable autocannon. This "sleek" variant seems to mainly be used by the Winslow Accord and its allies and was designed by Ben Mauro. Α]  Both variants have doors on their sides and a rear access ramp. 


Company Profile

Bristow Group Inc. provides aviation services to integrated, national, and independent offshore energy companies in the United States. It also offers commercial and public sector search and rescue services and other ad hoc helicopter and fixed wing&hellip

Bristow Group Inc. provides aviation services to integrated, national, and independent offshore energy companies in the United States. It also offers commercial and public sector search and rescue services and other ad hoc helicopter and fixed wing transportation services. As of March 31, 2021, the company had a fleet of 247 aircraft. It also has operations in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Guyana, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Norway, Spain, Suriname, Trinidad, the United Kingdom. The company was founded 1948 and is headquartered in Houston, Texas.

Sector (GICS®)

Industry (GICS®)

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Bristow Group Inc. (VTOL)

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Bristow Group Reports Second Quarter Fiscal Year 2021 Results

* Net loss of $27.9 million, or .95 per diluted share, in Q2 FY21 * EBITDA adjusted to exclude special items and gains or losses on asset dispositions was $54.2 million in Q2 FY21 compared to $44.3 million in Q1 * Adjusted Free Cash Flow excluding Net Capex was $57.0 million in Q2 FY21 * As of September 30, 2020, unrestricted cash balance was $301.4 million with total liquidity of $358.6 million * During September, the Company repurchased 345,327 shares at an average price of $21.93 per shareHOUSTON, Nov. 04, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Bristow Group Inc. (NYSE: VTOL) today reported net loss attributable to the Company of $27.9 million, or .95 per diluted share, for its second quarter ended September 30, 2020 (“current quarter”) on operating revenues of $295.7 million compared to net income attributable to the Company of $71.5 million, or $5.16 per diluted share, for the quarter ended June 30, 2020 (“preceding quarter”) on operating revenues of $261.5 million.Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (“EBITDA”) was $12.6 million in the current quarter compared to $97.0 million in the preceding quarter. EBITDA adjusted to exclude special items and gains or losses on asset dispositions was $54.2 million in the current quarter compared to $44.3 million in the preceding quarter. The following table provides a bridge between EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA excluding gains or losses on asset dispositions. See Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Metrics for a reconciliation of net income, the most directly comparable GAAP measure, to EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA. Three Months Ended, September 30, 2020 June 30, 2020 EBITDA$12,568 $96,974 Special items: Organizational restructuring costs$13,326 $3,011 Loss on impairment17,596 19,233 PBH intangible amortization5,644 5,136 Merger-related costs4,497 17,420 Government grants(2,201) (1,760) Bargain purchase gain(5,660) (75,433) Early extinguishment of debt fees— 615 Change in fair value of preferred stock derivative liability— (15,416) $33,202 $(47,194) Adjusted EBITDA$45,770 $49,780 (Gains) losses on asset dispositions, net8,473 (5,522) Adjusted EBITDA excluding asset dispositions$54,243 $44,258 “Despite the challenging conditions in the offshore oil and gas industry, which are likely to persist for the next year, Bristow’s robust cash position and diversified, resilient business model facilitated the return of capital to shareholders via opportunistic share repurchases,” said Chris Bradshaw, President and Chief Executive Officer of Bristow. “We will continue to execute a capital-disciplined approach, focused on generating positive free cash flow, protecting the balance sheet and opportunistically returning capital to shareholders.”Sequential Quarter ResultsOperating revenues in the current quarter were $34.2 million higher compared to the preceding quarter. Operating revenues from oil and gas services were $19.1 million higher primarily due to the full quarter benefit of the merger of Era Group Inc. and Bristow Group Inc. on June 11, 2020 (“Merger”), partially offset by a decrease in utilization in our Africa and Europe Caspian regions. Operating revenues from fixed wing services were $8.8 million higher primarily due to higher utilization in Australia and the strengthening of the Australian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar. Operating revenues from U.K. SAR services were $4.4 million higher in the current quarter primarily due to increased flight hours and the strengthening of the British pound sterling relative to the U.S. dollar.Operating expenses were $41.5 million higher in the current quarter primarily due to the full quarter impact of the Merger and the recognition of severance costs following the Merger.General and administrative expenses were $3.7 million higher in the current quarter primarily due to the full quarter impact of the Merger.During the current quarter, the Company sold ten H225 heavy, nine S-76C++ medium and twelve B407 single engine helicopters for cash proceeds of $40.5 million, resulting in losses of $8.5 million. During the preceding quarter, the Company sold one H225 heavy helicopter for cash proceeds of $11.7 million, resulting in gains of $5.5 million.During the current quarter, the Company recognized a loss on impairment of $12.4 million related to the write down of inventory and a loss on impairment of $5.2 million related to helicopters that were transferred to held for sale assets. During the preceding quarter, the Company recognized losses on the impairment of its investment in Líder Táxi Aéreo S.A. (“Líder”) of $18.7 million and an inventory impairment of .5 million. The Company ended its minority ownership interest in Líder effective August 31, 2020.During the current quarter, the Company recognized gains of $1.9 million from its equity investments compared to losses of $2.0 million in the preceding quarter. The preceding quarter included $4.8 million of losses from the investment in Lider.During the preceding quarter, the Company recognized benefits of $15.4 million related to a decrease in the fair value of preferred stock derivative. The preferred stock was eliminated upon closing of the Merger.During the current quarter and preceding quarter, the Company recognized a bargain purchase gain of $5.7 million and $75.4 million, respectively, related to the Merger. The current quarter gain was an adjustment to the previously calculated excess of the fair value of legacy Era’s identified assets acquired and liabilities assumed.Other income, net of $10.6 million during the current quarter was primarily due to net foreign exchange gains of $6.9 million, a favorable interest adjustment to the Company’s pension liability of .9 million and other income related to Airnorth (government grants) of $2.7 million. Other income, net of $3.4 million in the preceding quarter was primarily due to net foreign exchange gains of $1.4 million, a favorable interest adjustment to the Company’s pension liability of .9 million and other income related to Airnorth (government grants) of $1.2 million.Income tax expense was $8.6 million in the current quarter compared to an income tax benefit of $3.3 million in the preceding quarter. The income tax expense in the current quarter primarily related to changes in the blend of earnings, the tax impact of valuation allowances on the Company’s net operating losses and deductible business interest expense.Calendar Quarter ResultsOperating revenues in the current quarter were $9.0 million lower compared to the quarter ended September 30, 2019 (“prior year quarter”).Operating revenues from oil and gas services were $6.5 million lower. Operating revenues in our Europe Caspian region were $16.0 million lower primarily due to lower utilization, partially offset by the strengthening of the British pound sterling relative to the U.S. dollar. Operating revenues in our Africa and Asia Pacific regions were $19.6 million and $3.6 million lower, respectively, primarily due to lower utilization. These decreases were partially offset by a $32.8 million increase in operating revenues in our Americas region due to the Merger.Operating revenues from fixed wing services were $7.6 million lower in the current quarter primarily due to lower utilization.Operating revenues from U.K. SAR services were $2.5 million higher in the current quarter primarily due to an increase in flight hours.Operating expenses were $4.7 million lower in the current quarter. Lease costs were $5.9 million lower in the current quarter primarily due to aircraft lease rejections related to Old Bristow’s voluntary petitions seeking relief under Chapter 11 of Title 11 of the U.S. Code (“Chapter 11”) during the prior year quarter. Fuel, maintenance and other operating expenses were lower primarily due to the decrease in activity discussed above. These decreases were partially offset by an $11.5 million increase in personnel costs primarily due to a net increase in headcount and severance costs related to the Merger.General and administrative expenses were $1.4 million higher in the current quarter primarily due to the impact of the Merger.Depreciation and amortization expense was $12.8 million lower in the current quarter primarily due to the revaluation of assets in connection with the adoption of fresh-start accounting.During the current quarter, the Company recognized a loss on impairment of $12.4 million related to the write down of inventory and a loss on impairment of $5.2 million related to helicopters that were transferred to held for sale assets. During the prior year quarter, Old Bristow recognized a loss on the impairment of H225 helicopters of $42.0 million, goodwill impairment of $17.5 million related to Airnorth and a $2.6 million impairment of the investment in Sky Futures Partners Limited.During the current quarter, the Company sold ten H225 heavy, nine S-76C++ medium and twelve B407 single engine helicopters for cash proceeds of $40.5 million, resulting in losses of $8.5 million.During the current quarter, the Company recognized gains of $1.9 million from its equity investments compared to gains of .6 million in the prior year quarter.Interest expense was $9.3 million lower in the current quarter primarily due to lower debt balances.Reorganization items incurred in the prior year quarter related to the Chapter 11 reorganization process.During the current quarter, the Company recognized a bargain purchase gain of $5.7 million related to the Merger. The current quarter gain was an adjustment to the previously calculated excess of the fair value of legacy Era’s identified assets acquired and liabilities assumed.Other income, net was $10.6 million in the current quarter compared to other expense, net of $6.6 million in the prior year quarter. Other income in the current quarter was primarily due to net foreign exchange gains of $6.9 million, a favorable interest adjustment to the Company’s pension liability of .9 million and other income related to Airnorth (government grants) of $2.7 million. Other expense, net in the prior year quarter was primarily due to net foreign exchange losses of $5.8 million and an unfavorable interest adjustment to the Company’s pension liability of .9 million.The Company’s effective tax rate was (44.2)% in the current quarter compared to 11.8% in the prior year quarter. The change in the Company’s effective tax rate primarily related to changes in the blend of earnings, releases of valuation allowances on the Company’s net operating losses and nondeductible professional fees related to the Merger.Liquidity and Capital AllocationAs of September 30, 2020, the Company had $301.4 million of unrestricted cash and $57.2 million of remaining availability under its amended asset-based revolving credit facility (the “ABL Facility”) for total liquidity of $358.6 million. Borrowings under the amended ABL Facility are subject to certain conditions and requirements.During the current quarter, the Company repurchased 345,327 shares for gross consideration of $7.6 million, representing an average purchase price of $21.93 per share.In the current quarter, cash proceeds from dispositions of property and equipment were $40.5 million and purchases of property and equipment were $4.5 million, resulting in net (proceeds from)/purchases of property and equipment (“Net Capex”) of $(36.0) million. In the preceding quarter, cash proceeds from dispositions of property and equipment were $11.7 million and purchases of property and equipment were $2.8 million, resulting in Net Capex of $(8.8) million. See Adjusted Free Cash Flow Reconciliation for a reconciliation of Net Capex and Adjusted Free Cash Flow.Conference CallManagement will conduct a conference call starting at 10:00 a.m. ET (9:00 a.m. CT) on Thursday, November 5, 2020, to review the results for the fiscal second quarter ended September 30, 2020. The conference call can be accessed as follows:All callers will need to reference the access code 5314473.Within the U.S.: Operator Assisted Toll-Free Dial-In Number: (800) 367-2403Outside the U.S.: Operator Assisted International Dial-In Number: (334) 777-6978ReplayA telephone replay will be available through November 19, 2020 by dialing 888-203-1112 and utilizing the access code above. An audio replay will also be available on the Company’s website at www.bristowgroup.com shortly after the call and will be accessible through November 19, 2020. The accompanying investor presentation will be available on November 5, 2020 on Bristow’s website at www.bristowgroup.com.For additional information concerning Bristow, contact Grant Newman at (713) 369-4692 or visit Bristow Group’s website at https://ir.bristowgroup.com/.About Bristow GroupBristow Group Inc. is the leading global provider of vertical flight solutions. Bristow primarily provides aviation services to a broad base of major integrated, national and independent offshore energy companies. Bristow provides commercial search and rescue (“SAR”) services in several countries and public sector SAR services in the United Kingdom (“U.K.”) on behalf of the Maritime & Coastguard Agency (“MCA”). Additionally, the Company also offers ad hoc helicopter and fixed wing transportation services. Bristow’s customers charter its helicopters primarily to transport personnel between onshore bases and offshore production platforms, drilling rigs and other installations. To a lesser extent, Bristow’s customers also charter its helicopters to transport time-sensitive equipment to these offshore locations.Bristow’s core business of providing aviation services to leading global oil and gas companies and public and private sector SAR services, as well as fixed wing transportation and ad hoc services, provides it with geographic and customer diversity which helps mitigate risks associated with a single market or customer. Bristow currently has customers in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Guyana, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Norway, Spain, Suriname, Trinidad, the U.K. and the U.S.Forward-Looking Statements DisclosureThis press release contains “forward-looking statements.” Forward-looking statements give Bristow Group Inc.’s (the “Company”) current expectations or forecasts of future events. Forward-looking statements generally can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “intend,” “estimate,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “project,” or “continue,” or other similar words. These statements are made under the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, reflect management’s current views with respect to future events and therefore are subject to significant risks and uncertainties, both known and unknown. The Company’s actual results may vary materially from those anticipated in forward-looking statements. The Company cautions investors not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements.Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of the document in which they are made. The Company disclaims any obligation or undertaking to provide any updates or revisions to any forward-looking statement to reflect any change in the Company’s expectations or any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which the forward-looking statement is based that occur after the date hereof. Risks that may affect forward-looking statements include, but are not necessarily limited to, those relating to: the COVID-19 pandemic and related economic repercussions have resulted, and may continue to result, in a decrease in the price of and demand for oil, which has caused, and may continue to cause, a decrease in the demand for our services expected cost synergies and other benefits of the merger (the “Merger”) of the entity formerly known as Bristow Group Inc. (“Old Bristow”) and Era Group Inc. (“Era”) might not be realized within the expected time frames, might be less than projected or may not be realized at all the ability to successfully integrate the operations, accounting and administrative functions of Era and Old Bristow managing a significantly larger company than before the completion of the Merger diversion of management time on issues related to integration of the companies the increase in indebtedness as a result of the Merger operating costs, customer loss and business disruption following the Merger, including, without limitation, difficulties in maintaining relationships with employees and customers, may be greater than expected our reliance on a limited number of customers and the reduction of our customer base as a result of bankruptcies or consolidation risks inherent in operating helicopters the Company’s ability to maintain an acceptable safety record and level of reliability the impact of increased U.S. and foreign government regulation and legislation, including potential government implemented moratoriums on drilling activities the impact of a grounding of all or a portion of the Company’s fleet for extended periods of time or indefinitely on the Company’s business, including its operations and ability to service customers, results of operations or financial condition and/or the market value of the affected helicopters the Company’s ability to successfully expand into other geographic and aviation service markets risks associated with political instability, governmental action, war, acts of terrorism and changes in the economic condition in any foreign country where the Company does business, which may result in expropriation, nationalization, confiscation or deprivation of the Company’s assets or result in claims of a force majeure situation the impact of declines in the global economy and financial markets the impact of fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates on the Company’s asset values and cost to purchase helicopters, spare parts and related services risks related to investing in new lines of aviation service without realizing the expected benefits risks of engaging in competitive processes or expending significant resources for strategic opportunities, with no guaranty of recoupment the Company’s reliance on a limited number of helicopter manufacturers and suppliers the Company’s ongoing need to replace aging helicopters the Company’s reliance on the secondary helicopter market to dispose of used helicopters and parts information technology related risks the impact of allocation of risk between the Company and its customers the liability, legal fees and costs in connection with providing emergency response services adverse weather conditions and seasonality risks associated with the Company’s debt structure the Company’s counterparty credit risk exposure the impact of operational and financial difficulties of the Company’s joint ventures and partners and the risks associated with identifying and securing joint venture partners when needed conflict with the other owners of the Company’s non-wholly owned subsidiaries and other equity investees adverse results of legal proceedings risks associated with significant increases in fuel costs the Company’s ability to obtain insurance coverage and the adequacy and availability of such coverage the possibility of labor problems the attraction and retention of qualified personnel restrictions on the amount of foreign ownership of the Company’s common stock and various other matters and factors, many of which are beyond the Company’s control. You should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements because the matters they describe are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other unpredictable factors, many of which are beyond our control. Our forward-looking statements are based on the information currently available to us and speak only as of the date hereof. New risks and uncertainties arise from time to time, and it is impossible for us to predict these matters or how they may affect us. We have included important factors in the section entitled “Risk Factors” in the Company’s joint proxy and consent solicitation statement/prospectus (File No. 333-237557), filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on May 5, 2020 and the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the Quarter ended September 30, 2020, which we believe over time, could cause our actual results, performance or achievements to differ from the anticipated results, performance or achievements that are expressed or implied by our forward-looking statements. You should consider all risks and uncertainties disclosed in the Proxy Statement and in our filings with the SEC, all of which are accessible on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.BRISTOW GROUP INC. CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (unaudited, in thousands, except share and per share amounts Successor Predecessor Three Months Ended September 30, 2020 Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 Three Months Ended September 30, 2019 Revenue: Operating revenue$295,722 $261,508 $304,684 Reimbursable revenue8,918 8,685 13,536 Total revenues304,640 270,193 318,220 Costs and expenses: Operating231,953 190,436 236,655 Reimbursable expense8,919 8,648 12,840 General and administrative39,268 35,523 37,820 Merger-related costs4,497 17,420 — Depreciation and amortization18,537 16,356 31,303 Total costs and expenses303,174 268,383 318,618 Loss on impairment(17,596) (19,233) (62,101) Gain (loss) on asset dispositions(8,473) 5,522 (230) Earnings (losses) from unconsolidated affiliates, net1,948 (1,978) 633 Operating loss(22,655) (13,879) (62,096) Interest income434 262 270 Interest expense(13,445) (12,504) (22,715) Reorganization items, net— — (93,943) Gain on sale of subsidiaries— — 420 Change in fair value of preferred stock derivative liability— 15,416 — Bargain purchase gain5,660 75,433 — Other income (expense), net10,592 3,386 (6,637) Total other income (expense)3,241 81,993 (122,605) Income (loss) before income taxes(19,414) 68,114 (184,701) Benefit (provision) for income taxes(8,578) 3,290 21,782 Net income (loss)(27,992) 71,404 (162,919) Net (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests131 73 (55) Net income (loss) attributable to Bristow Group Inc.$(27,861) $71,477 $(162,974) Basic earnings (loss) per common share$(0.95) $18.41 $(4.54) Diluted earnings (loss) per common share$(0.95) $5.16 $(4.54) Weighted average common shares outstanding, basic29,357,959 11,102,611 35,918,916 Weighted average common shares outstanding, diluted29,357,959 38,988,528 35,918,916 EBITDA$12,568 $96,974 $(130,683) Adjusted EBITDA$45,770 $49,780 $27,474 Adjusted EBITDA excluding asset dispositions$54,243 $44,258 $27,704 BRISTOW GROUP INC. REVENUES BY LINE OF SERVICE (unaudited, in thousands) Successor Predecessor Three Months Ended September 30, 2020 Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 Three Months Ended September 30, 2019 Oil and gas: Europe Caspian$98,495 $105,811 $114,537 Americas93,102 58,160 60,330 Africa21,237 30,015 40,855 Asia Pacific2,920 2,703 6,564 Total oil and gas215,754 196,689 222,286 UK SAR Services56,978 52,622 54,499 Fixed Wing Services20,310 11,472 27,891 Other2,680 725 8 $295,722 $261,508 $304,684 FLIGHT HOURS BY LINE OF SERVICE (unaudited) Successor Predecessor Three Months Ended September 30, 2020 Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 Three Months Ended September 30, 2019 Oil and gas: Europe Caspian12,330 12,476 14,708 Americas10,891 5,169 9,370 Africa1,743 1,457 4,271 Asia Pacific62 85 264 Total oil and gas25,026 19,187 28,613 UK SAR Services2,797 2,169 2,645 Fixed Wing Services3,391 2,164 3,594 31,214 23,520 34,852 BRISTOW GROUP INC. CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (in thousands) Successor September 30, 2020 March 31, 2020 ASSETS(unaudited) Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents$304,193 $199,121 Accounts receivable216,638 180,683 Inventories99,996 82,419 Assets held for sale22,463 32,401 Prepaid expenses and other current assets29,455 29,527 Total current assets672,745 524,151 Investment in unconsolidated affiliates89,924 110,058 Property and equipment1,085,087 901,314 Accumulated depreciation(55,557) (24,560) Net property and equipment1,029,530 876,754 Right-of-use assets281,164 305,962 Other assets139,022 128,336 Total assets$2,212,385 $1,945,261 LIABILITIES, REDEEMABLE NONCONTROLLING INTEREST AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY Current liabilities: Accounts payable$62,668 $52,110 Accrued liabilities224,536 200,129 Short-term borrowings and current maturities of long-term debt64,027 45,739 Total current liabilities351,231 297,978 Long-term debt, less current maturities580,342 515,385 Preferred stock embedded derivative— 286,182 Deferred taxes55,699 22,775 Long-term operating lease liabilities197,888 224,595 Deferred credits and other liabilities15,683 22,345 Total liabilities not subject to compromise1,200,843 1,369,260 Liabilities subject to compromise— — Total liabilities1,200,843 1,369,260 Redeemable noncontrolling interests1,483 Mezzanine equity— 149,785 Stockholders’ investment Common stock303 1 Additional paid-in capital683,390 295,897 Retained earnings326,721 139,228 Treasury shares, at cost7,680 — Accumulated other comprehensive income(7,579) (8,641) Total Bristow Group Inc. stockholders’ investment1,010,515 426,485 Noncontrolling interests(456) $(269) Total stockholders’ investment1,010,059 $426,216 Total liabilities, mezzanine equity and stockholders’ investment$2,212,385 $1,945,261 Reconciliation of Non-GAAP MetricsThe Company’s management uses EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA to assess the performance and operating results of its business. EBITDA is defined as Earnings before Interest expense, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization. Adjusted EBITDA is defined as EBITDA further adjusted for certain special items that occurred during the reported period, as noted below. The Company includes EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA to provide investors with a supplemental measure of its operating performance. Neither EBITDA nor Adjusted EBITDA is a recognized term under generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S. (“GAAP”). Accordingly, they should not be used as an indicator of, or an alternative to, net income as a measure of operating performance. In addition, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are not intended to be measures of free cash flow available for management’s discretionary use, as they do not consider certain cash requirements, such as debt service requirements. Because the definitions of EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA (or similar measures) may vary among companies and industries, they may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures used by other companies.The following table provides a reconciliation of net income, the most directly comparable GAAP measure, to EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA (in thousands). Successor Predecessor Three Months Ended September 30, 2020 Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 Three Months Ended September 30, 2019 Net income (loss)$(27,992) $71,404 $(162,919) Depreciation and amortization18,537 16,356 31,303 Interest expense13,445 12,504 22,715 Income tax (benefit) expense8,578 (3,290) (21,782) EBITDA$12,568 $96,974 $(130,683) Special items (1)33,202 (47,194) 158,157 Adjusted EBITDA$45,770 $49,780 $27,474 (Gains) losses on asset dispositions, net8,473 (5,522) 230 Adjusted EBITDA excluding asset dispositions$54,243 $44,258 $27,704 (1) Special items include the following: Successor Predecessor Three Months Ended September 30, 2020 Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 Three Months Ended September 30, 2019 Organizational restructuring costs$13,326 $3,011 $2,533 Loss on impairment17,596 19,233 62,101 PBH intangible amortization5,644 5,136 — Merger-related costs4,497 17,420 — Government grants(2)(2,201) (1,760) — Bargain purchase gain(5,660) (75,433) — Early extinguishment of debt fees— 615 — Change in fair value of preferred stock derivative liability— (15,416) — Bankruptcy related costs— — 93,943 Loss on sale of subsidiaries— — (420) $33,202 $(47,194) $158,157 ___________________________(2) COVID-19 related government relief grantsPro Forma Q1 FY21 ReconciliationPro Forma EBITDA and Pro Forma Adjusted EBITDA reflect EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA of Old Bristow and Era Group Inc. before the Merger for the period beginning April 1, 2020 through June 11, 2020, plus EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA for the post-Merger period through June 30, 2020. The following table provides a reconciliation of net income, the most directly comparable GAAP measure, to Pro Forma EBITDA and Pro Forma Adjusted EBITDA for the three months ended June 30, 2020 (in thousands). Old Bristow Era Group Inc. Legacy Era Pro Forma Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 April 1, 2020 - June 11, 2020 June 12 - 30, 2020 Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 Net income (loss)$75,708 $(18,059) $(4,305) $53,344 Depreciation and amortization15,914 7,818 443 24,175 Interest expense11,755 2,650 749 15,154 Income tax (benefit) expense(3,798) (2,467) 508 (5,757) EBITDA$99,579 $(10,058) $(2,605) $86,916 Special items (1)(49,696) 13,744 2,502 (33,450) Adjusted EBITDA$49,883 $3,686 $(103) $53,466 (Gains) losses on asset dispositions, net(5,527) 141 5 (5,381) Adjusted EBITDA excluding asset dispositions$44,356 $3,827 $(98) $48,085 (1) Special items include the following: Old Bristow Era Group Inc. Legacy Era Pro Forma Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 April 1, 2020 - June 11, 2020 June 12 - 30, 2020 Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 Loss on impairments$19,233 $— $— $19,233 Merger-related costs15,103 13,575 2,317 30,995 PBH intangible amortization4,951 169 185 5,305 Organizational restructuring costs3,011 — — 3,011 Early extinguishment of debt fees615 — — 615 Government grants(2)(1,760) — — (1,760) Change in fair value of preferred stock derivative liability(15,416) — — (15,416) Bargain purchase gain(75,433) — — (75,433) $(49,696) $13,744 $2,502 $(33,450) ___________________________(2) COVID-19 related government relief grantsPro Forma Q2 FY20 ReconciliationPro Forma EBITDA and Pro Forma Adjusted EBITDA reflect EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA of Old Bristow and Era Group Inc. before the Merger. The following table provides a reconciliation of net income, the most directly comparable GAAP measure, to Pro Forma EBITDA and Pro Forma Adjusted EBITDA for the three months ended September 30, 2019 (in thousands). Old Bristow Era Group Inc. Pro Forma Net income (loss)$(162,919) $(2,059) $(164,978) Depreciation and amortization31,303 9,312 40,615 Interest expense22,715 3,464 26,179 Income tax (benefit) expense(21,782) 515 (21,267) EBITDA$(130,683) $11,232 $(119,451) Special items (1)158,157 396 158,553 Adjusted EBITDA$27,474 $11,628 $39,102 (Gains) losses on asset dispositions, net230 (754) (524) Adjusted EBITDA excluding asset dispositions$27,704 $10,874 $38,578 (1) Special items include the following: Old Bristow Era Group Inc. Pro Forma Bankruptcy related costs$93,943 $— $93,943 Loss on impairments62,101 — 62,101 Organizational restructuring costs2,533 — 2,533 Gain on disposal of subsidiaries(420) — (420) Merger-related costs— 182 182 PBH intangible amortization— 214 214 $158,157 $396 $158,553 Pro Forma LTM ReconciliationPro Forma EBITDA and Pro Forma Adjusted EBITDA reflect EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA of Old Bristow and Era Group Inc. before the Merger for the period beginning October 1, 2019 through June 11, 2020, plus EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA for the post-Merger period through September 30, 2020. The following table provides a reconciliation of net income, the most directly comparable GAAP measure, to Pro Forma EBITDA and Pro Forma Adjusted EBITDA for the twelve months ended September 30, 2020 (in thousands). Old Bristow Era Group Inc. Legacy Era Bristow Group Inc. Pro Forma October 1, 2019 - June 30, 2020 October 1, 2019 - June 11, 2020 June 12 - 30, 2020 QTD September 30, 2020 LTM September 30, 2020 Net income (loss)$(289,416) $(26,159) $(4,305) $(27,992) $(347,872) Depreciation and amortization52,374 26,662 443 18,537 98,016 Interest expense113,954 9,606 749 13,445 137,754 Income tax (benefit) expense(17,204) (4,350) 508 8,578 (12,468) EBITDA$(140,292) $5,759 $(2,605) $12,568 $(124,570) Special items (1)253,109 21,898 2,502 33,202 310,711 Adjusted EBITDA$112,817 $27,657 $(103) $45,770 $186,141 (Gains) losses on asset dispositions, net(5,325) (2,920) 5 8,473 233 Adjusted EBITDA excluding asset dispositions$107,492 $24,737 $(98) $54,243 $186,374 (1) Special items include the following: Old Bristow Era Group Inc. Legacy Era Bristow Group Inc. Pro Forma October 1, 2019 - June 30, 2020 October 1, 2019 - June 11, 2020 June 12 - 30, 2020 QTD September 30, 2020 LTM September 30, 2020 Bankruptcy related costs$454,906 $— $— $— $454,906 Loss on impairments28,824 2,369 — 17,596 48,789 Merger-related costs21,433 18,933 2,317 4,497 47,180 PBH intangible amortization20,453 596 185 5,644 26,878 Organizational restructuring costs3,627 — — 13,326 16,953 Early extinguishment of debt fees615 — — — 615 Government grants(2)(1,760) — — (2,201) (3,961) Bargain purchase gain(75,433) — — (5,660) (81,093) Change in fair value of preferred stock derivative liability(199,556) — — — (199,556) $253,109 $21,898 $2,502 $33,202 $310,711 ___________________________(2) COVID-19 related government relief grantsAdjusted Free Cash Flow ReconciliationFree Cash Flow represents the Company’s net cash provided by operating activities plus proceeds from disposition of property and equipment, less expenditures related to purchases of property and equipment. Adjusted Free Cash Flow is Free Cash Flow adjusted to exclude professional services fees and other costs paid in relation to the Merger, fresh-start accounting and the Chapter 11 Cases. Management believes that the use of Adjusted Free Cash Flow is meaningful as it measures the Company’s ability to generate cash from its business after excluding cash payments for special items. Management uses this information as an analytical indicator to assess the Company’s liquidity and performance. However, investors should note numerous methods may exist for calculating a company’s free cash flow. As a result, the method used by management to calculate Adjusted Free Cash Flow may differ from the methods used by other companies to calculate their free cash flow.The following table provides a reconciliation of net cash provided by operating activities, the most directly comparable GAAP measure, to Free Cash Flow and Adjusted Free Cash Flow (in thousands). Successor Three Months Ended September 30, 2020 Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities$41,857 $(6,866) Plus: Proceeds from disposition of property and equipment40,475 11,665 Less: Purchases of property and equipment(4,523) (2,849) Free Cash Flow$77,809 $1,950 Plus: Organizational restructuring costs13,326 4,176 Plus: Merger-related costs4,026 19,743 Less: Government grants(2,201) (1,760) Adjusted Free Cash Flow$92,960 $24,109 Net (proceeds from)/purchases of property and equipment (“Net Capex”)(35,952) (8,816) Adjusted Free Cash Flow excluding Net Capex$57,008 $15,293 BRISTOW GROUP INC. FLEET COUNT (unaudited) Number of Aircraft Operating Aircraft Type Owned Aircraft Leased Aircraft Aircraft Held For Sale Consolidated Aircraft Max Pass. Capacity Heavy Helicopters: S-92A 35 30 — 65 19 S-92A U.K. SAR 3 9 — 12 19 H225 — — 2 2 19 AW189 6 1 — 7 16 AW189 U.K. SAR 11 — — 11 16 55 40 2 97 Medium Helicopters: AW139 53 8 — 61 12 S-76 C+/C++ 28 — 3 31 12 S-76D 8 — 2 10 12 B212 3 — — 3 12 B412 — — 2 2 13 92 8 7 107 Light—Twin Engine Helicopters: AW109 6 — — 6 7 EC135 10 — — 10 6 BO105 2 — — 2 4 18 — — 18 Light—Single Engine Helicopters: AS350 17 — — 17 4 AW119 13 — — 13 7 B407 7 — — 7 6 37 — — 37 Total Helicopters 202 48 9 259 Fixed wing 7 5 3 15 UAV — 2 — 2 Total Fleet 209 55 12 276 The chart below presents the number of aircraft in our fleet and their distribution among the regions in which we operate as of September 30, 2020 and the percentage of operating revenue that each of our regions provided during the current quarter. Percentage of Current Quarter Operating Revenue Heavy Medium Light Twin Light Single UAV Fixed Wing Total Europe Caspian57% 66 15 — 4 2 — 87 Africa10% 7 22 — — — 3 32 Americas27% 24 68 18 33 — — 143 Asia Pacific6% — 2 — — — 12 14 Total100% 97 107 18 37 2 15 276

Bristow Group Announces Fiscal Year 2021 Second Quarter Earnings Release Call

HOUSTON, Oct. 28, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Bristow Group Inc. (NYSE: VTOL), the global leader in vertical flight solutions, today announced it will release financial results for its second quarter fiscal year 2021 after the market closes on Wednesday, November 4, 2020. In connection with the release, Bristow has scheduled a conference call for Thursday, November 5, 2020 to begin at 10 a.m. ET (9 a.m. CT). Investors may participate in the call by phone. Dial 800-367-2403 for domestic callers or +1 334-777-6978 for international callers, at least 10 minutes before the call, using the access code 5314473. A telephone replay will be available until noon on November 19, 2020, by dialing 888-203-1112 and utilizing the access code above. The accompanying investor presentation will be available on November 5, 2020, on the investor section of Bristow’s website at www.bristowgroup.com.ABOUT BRISTOW GROUP Bristow Group Inc. is the leading global provider of vertical flight solutions. Bristow primarily provides aviation services to a broad base of major integrated, national and independent offshore energy companies. Bristow provides commercial search and rescue (“SAR”) services in several countries and public sector SAR services in the United Kingdom (“U.K.”) on behalf of the Maritime & Coastguard Agency (“MCA”). Additionally, the Company also offers ad hoc helicopter and fixed wing transportation services. Bristow's customers charter its helicopters primarily to transport personnel between onshore bases and offshore production platforms, drilling rigs and other installations. To a lesser extent, Bristow's customers also charter its helicopters to transport time-sensitive equipment to these offshore locations.Bristow's core business of providing aviation services to leading global oil and gas companies and public and private sector SAR services, as well as fixed wing transportation and ad hoc services, provides it with geographic and customer diversity which helps mitigate risks associated with a single market or customer. Bristow currently has customers in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Guyana, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Norway, Spain, Suriname, Trinidad, the U.K. and the U.S. To learn more, visit our website at www.bristowgroup.com. Investors Bristow Group Inc. Grant Newman +1 713.369.4692 [email protected] Media Bristow Group Inc. Adam Morgan +1 832.783.7927 [email protected]

Bristow Group to Participate in Deutsche Bank’s 28th Annual Leveraged Finance Conference

HOUSTON, Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Bristow Group Inc. (NYSE: VTOL), one of the largest helicopter operators in the world, plans to participate in the 28th annual Deutsche Bank Leveraged Finance Conference taking place October 5th through 7th. Bristow’s President and CEO Chris Bradshaw, Chief Financial Officer Jennifer Whalen and Treasurer & Head of Investor Relations, Grant Newman, will participate in one-on-one meetings on Tuesday, October 6th. The accompanying presentation will be available on the Investor section of Bristow’s website at http://ir.bristowgroup.com/.ABOUT BRISTOW GROUP Bristow is the world’s leading provider of offshore oil and gas transportation, search and rescue (SAR) and aircraft support services to government and civil organizations worldwide. Bristow’s strategically located global fleet supports operations in the North Sea, Nigeria and the U.S. Gulf of Mexico as well as in most of the other major offshore oil and gas producing regions of the world, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad. Bristow provides SAR services to the private sector worldwide and to the public sector for all of the United Kingdom on behalf of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. To learn more, visit our website at www.bristowgroup.com.Investors Bristow Group Inc. Grant Newman +1 713.369.4692 [email protected]

Bristow to continue delivering UK SAR helicopter service for HM Coastguard under extended contract

S-92 Search and Rescue aircraft S-92 Search and Rescue aircraft * Bristow received a contract extension until 31 December 2026 to provide search and rescue services for the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) * The extension of the current contract allows Bristow to cost-effectively introduce new capabilities into the existing helicopter fleet and to explore technologies which may be of benefit in future contracts * Bristow will continue to provide support to HM Coastguard with a modern fleet of 11 AW189 and 10 S-92 SAR equipped aircraft at 10 strategic locations around the UK ABERDEEN, Scotland, Sept. 29, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Bristow Helicopters Limited has been awarded a contract extension to continue delivering UK search and rescue (SAR) helicopter service for HM Coastguard, the emergency response service of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA).Bristow will continue its role as a key enabler in the search and rescue community under an extended contract confirmed by the MCA. The UK’s current commercial contract for search and rescue helicopter service provision to HM Coastguard was awarded to Bristow in March 2013. The extended contract will run through 31 December 2026 and will facilitate the procurement process for the next contract, known as the UKSAR2G programme.“Our specialist teams have worked tirelessly, diligently and with unquestionable pride to ensure the transition from a military and coastguard operation to a fully commercialised SAR helicopter service,” said Alan Corbett, chief executive of Bristow Helicopters Limited and Senior Vice President for Europe, Africa, Middle East, Asia and Search and Rescue.“We have, throughout the years since, committed ourselves to delivering a service that is equal to or better than that which it replaced. The post-implementation report commissioned by the MCA, prepared by QinetiQ, confirms the success of that process, and the achievement of many of the goals identified as key measures of success,” he said.“Bristow remains fully committed to working with the MCA to realise its remaining goals. The extension of the current contract allows us to cost-effectively introduce new capabilities into the existing helicopter fleet and to explore technologies which may be of benefit in future contracts.”Employing approximately 360 people, Bristow operates from 10 strategically located SAR helicopter bases around the UK on behalf of Her Majesty’s Coastguard to respond to all SAR incidents for the whole of the UK. About HM CoastguardHM Coastguard is a frontline delivery and emergency response organisation which is part of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency.HM Coastguard provides a UK-wide maritime emergency prevention and response capability which responds to calls for help by radio, satellite or the 999 service and coordinates maritime search and rescue (SAR) within the UK SAR region. The agency helps approximately 25,000 people each year with 21,000 incidents coordinated by its rescue centres.For further information please contact: Maritime and Coastguard Agency Press Office [email protected] 0203 8172222About Bristow Helicopters LimitedBristow Helicopters Limited is the provider of helicopter search and rescue (SAR) services in the UK, on behalf of Her Majesty's Coastguard. Bristow Helicopters has a long history of providing world class SAR services, beginning in 1971 at RAF Manston, and has flown more than 60,000 SAR operational hours in the UK and conducted over 15,000 SAR missions, during which more than 7,000 people have been rescued by Bristow crews and helicopters. For more information on Bristow’s SAR operations, please visit www.bristowgroup.com.Bristow Helicopters Limited has served the offshore oil transport industry in the UK for nearly 60 years. Bristow Helicopters Limited is an affiliated company of Bristow Group Inc.Bristow Group Inc. Adam Morgan Director, Global Communications +1 281.253.9005 [email protected] Helicopters Communications Alan Gorham, BIG Partnership on behalf of Bristow [email protected] 07483288807A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/b71dd0f0-03c0-4c70-941c-d2ff55f66fb0

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Bristow Names Jennifer Whalen Chief Financial Officer and Approves $75 Million Share Repurchase Program

HOUSTON, Sept. 16, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Jennifer Whalen has been appointed Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer (CFO) for Bristow Group Inc. effective today. In this role, she is responsible for accounting, financial reporting, investor relations, M&A, tax and other financial aspects of the Company. She was previously serving as the CFO in an interim role since June 2020. “Jennifer brings a wealth of knowledge about our business as well as existing relationships that will help the newly combined company enhance internal controls, processes and operations,” said Bristow President and Chief Executive Officer Chris Bradshaw. “I believe Jennifer is the best person for the job, as we navigate and mitigate the effects of the downturn in the offshore oil and gas industry and emerge with a more efficient cost structure.”Jennifer previously served as the Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer for Era Group Inc. from February 2018 to June 2020. She served as Era’s Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer from August 2013 until her appointment as Vice President, Acting Chief Financial Officer in June 2017. Jennifer joined Era as Controller in April 2012. “I am excited for the opportunity to continue to partner with my colleagues as we execute our strategy around efficiency and cash flow generation,” said Jennifer Whalen, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. From August 2007 to March 2012, Jennifer served in several capacities at nLIGHT Photonics Corporation, a supplier of high-performance lasers, including as Director of Accounting. Prior to these roles, Jennifer served as the Manager of Accounting at InFocus Corporation for over two years. After serving in the U.S. military, Jennifer started her career in public accounting in the assurance practice group at PricewaterhouseCoopers for five years.She received a B.S. in Accounting from Alabama A&M University and a master’s degree in Accounting from the University of Southern California.Bristow also announced today that on September 16, 2020, its Board of Directors approved a new $75 million share repurchase program. Repurchases under the program may be made in the open market, including pursuant to a Rule 10b5-1 plan, by block repurchases, in private transactions (including with related parties) or otherwise, from time to time, depending on market conditions. The program is expected to be funded using cash on hand and cash generated from operations. The repurchase program does not require Bristow to acquire any specific number of shares and may be terminated or suspended at any time. About Bristow GroupBristow is the world’s leading provider of offshore oil and gas transportation, search and rescue (SAR) and aircraft support services to government and civil organizations worldwide. Bristow’s strategically located global fleet supports operations in the North Sea, Nigeria and the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, as well as in most of the other major offshore oil and gas producing regions of the world, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad. Bristow provides SAR services to the private sector worldwide and to the public sector for all of the United Kingdom on behalf of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. To learn more, visit our website at www.bristowgroup.com. Bristow Group Inc.Investors Grant Newman +1 713.369.4692 [email protected] News Media Adam Morgan +1 281.253.9005 [email protected]

Bristow Group to Present at the 2020 Barclays CEO Energy-Power Conference

HOUSTON, Sept. 02, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Bristow Group Inc. (NYSE: VTOL), one of the largest helicopter operators in the world, will present a virtual presentation at the Barclays CEO Energy-Power Conference held on September 8-10, 2020. Bristow’s President and Chief Executive Officer, Chris Bradshaw, will present on Wednesday, September 9, 2020 at 3:45 p.m. ET and participate in investor meetings throughout the day. The accompanying investor presentation will be available on the Investor section of Bristow’s website at http://ir.bristowgroup.com/. ABOUT BRISTOW GROUP Bristow is the world’s leading provider of offshore oil and gas transportation, search and rescue (SAR) and aircraft support services to government and civil organizations worldwide. Bristow’s strategically located global fleet supports operations in the North Sea, Nigeria and the U.S. Gulf of Mexico as well as in most of the other major offshore oil and gas producing regions of the world, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad. Bristow provides SAR services to the private sector worldwide and to the public sector for all of the United Kingdom on behalf of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. To learn more, visit our website at www.bristowgroup.com.Investors Bristow Group Inc. Grant Newman +1 713.369.4692 [email protected]

Bristow to Rebrand Aeróleo, Affirms Commitment in Brazil

* Aeróleo, an integral part of the oil and gas industry in Brazil for more than 40 years, to be renamed Bristow, affirming the Company’s commitment in Brazil * Bristow has ended its 41.5 percent ownership interest in Líder Taxi Aéreo S.A. – Air BrasilRIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil, Sept. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Bristow Group Inc. (NYSE: VTOL), the largest offshore helicopter operator in the world, announced today it will rename its Aeróleo division in Brazil to Bristow and remain focused on its support of the oil and gas industry and other vertical lift solutions.Bristow has been an integral part of the oil and gas industry in Brazil for more than 40 years, servicing the helicopter support needs of Petróleo Brasileiro S.A. - Petrobras, independent Brazilian exploration and production companies and multiple international oil and gas companies.“Despite the challenging market conditions, we maintain our strong presence in Brazil. We offer customers a modern fleet of aircraft, to include the AW139, and our strong safety record is unmatched,” said Diego Medeiros, Country Manager for Brazil. “Being a part of the larger Bristow family has many advantages by bringing global expertise and aviation solutions from operating a fleet of 300 aircraft.”“Brazil is an important part of our global footprint and future strategy,” said Samantha Willenbacher, Bristow’s Senior Vice President, Chief Commercial Officer. “As the largest global operator of AW139, AW189 and S-92 helicopters, we continue to serve our customers with exemplary vertical flight solutions and look forward to working with an expanded customer base to meet all of their rotary needs.”With more than 300,000 flight hours recorded, Bristow in Brazil is recognized as a leader in providing dependable vertical flight solutions. Bristow currently operates a modern fleet of 12 AW139s in Brazil. In addition to offering vertical flight solutions for onshore and offshore exploration, development and production activities, Bristow provides MEDEVAC, charter flights and flight support for various seismic operations to support several international companies operating in the region.Bristow has also ended its 41.5 percent minority, non-controlling ownership interest in Líder Taxi Aéreo S.A. – Air Brasil, effective August 31, 2020. About Bristow GroupBristow is the world’s leading provider of offshore oil and gas transportation, search and rescue (SAR) and aircraft support services to government and civil organizations worldwide. Bristow’s strategically located global fleet supports operations in the North Sea, Nigeria and the U.S. Gulf of Mexico as well as in most of the other major offshore oil and gas producing regions of the world, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad. Bristow provides SAR services to the private sector worldwide and to the public sector for all of the United Kingdom on behalf of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. To learn more, visit our website at www.bristowgroup.com.Bristow Group Inc.Investors Grant Newman +1 713.369.4692 [email protected] Media Adam Morgan +1 281.253.9005 [email protected]

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Contents

Helicopter [ edit | edit source ]

The helicopter's form of VTOL allows it to take off and land vertically, to hover, and to fly forwards, backwards, and laterally. These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft would usually not be able to take off or land. The capability to efficiently hover for extended periods of time is due to the helicopter's relatively long, and hence efficient rotor blades, and allows a helicopter to accomplish tasks that fixed-wing aircraft and other forms of vertical takeoff and landing aircraft could not perform at least as well until 2011.

On the other hand, the long rotor blades restrict the maximum speed to about 250 miles per hour of at least conventional helicopters, as retreating blade stall causes lateral instability.

Autogyro [ edit | edit source ]

Autogyros are also known as Gyroplanes or Gyrocopters. The rotor is unpowered and rotates freely in the airflow as the craft travels forward, so the craft needs a conventional powerplant to provide thrust. An autogyro is not intrinsically capable of VTOL: for VTO the rotor must be spun up to speed by an auxiliary drive, and vertical landing requires precise control of rotor momentum and pitch.

Gyrodyne [ edit | edit source ]

Gyrodynes are also known as Compound helicopters or Compound gyroplanes. A gyrodyne has the powered rotor of a helicopter with a separate forward thrust system of an autogyro. Apart from take-off and landing the rotor may be unpowered and autorotate. Designs may also include stub wings for added lift.

Cyclogyro [ edit | edit source ]

A cyclogyro or cyclocopter has a rotary wing whose axis and surfaces remain sideways across the airflow, as with a conventional wing.


Vertical Takeoff and Landing Aircraft

Vertical Takeoff and Landing Aircraft (known as VTOL aircraft) debuted in the Korean War primarily in the medevac role. The venerable piston‐powered Bell 47 (H�) helicopter provided the U.S. Army with an unprecedented ability to rapidly evacuate wounded personnel for lifesaving treatment. VTOL technology was first used in a significant combat role by U.S. forces during the Vietnam War. This was made possible by the advent of a practical turbine engine, providing excellent horsepower‐to‐weight ratios, coupled with advances in lightweight aluminum honeycomb construction techniques and epoxies that made strong, lightweight airframes possible, and rotor systems vastly improved over the older wooden blades. These technologies culminated in the Bell UH𠄁 (Huey), OH� (Kiowa), and AH𠄁 (Cobra), the Boeing Vertol CH� (Chinook), the Sikorsky CH� (SkyCrane), and the Hughes OH𠄆 (Cayuse). The civilian helicopter fleet during and after the Vietnam War was an outgrowth of the technology pioneered by the military, in which many aircraft were nearly indistinguishable from their military cousins.

One unique VTOL aircraft is the USMC single‐pilot Harrier ground attack/fighter aircraft. Developed by British Aerospace in the 1960s, the Harrier flies in the vertical flight mode solely by vectored thrust from a single engine, allowing overflight with transition to forward jet flight at the flick of a wrist. While rather fuel‐inefficient and very noisy, the Harrier stands alone as the only operational VTOL jet worldwide.

VTOL aircraft have revolutionized combat for the ground forces over the last fifty years, and the technology developed has found numerous uses in the civilian world. Improvements in VTOL technology, such as the U.S. Navy/Marine V� “Osprey” tilt‐rotor aircraft, may someday make VTOL aircraft the rule and eliminate the need for runways in either military or civilian aviation.
[See also Helicopters.]

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VTOL airplane

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VTOL airplane, abbreviation of Vertical Takeoff And Landing Airplane, any of several unconventional aircraft with rotating wing systems, such as the helicopter and autogiro. They may also have rotatable jet systems capable of vertical lift-off and landing in areas that only slightly exceed the overall dimensions of the aircraft.

The first operational VTOL jet aircraft was the British Royal Air Force Harrier its jet engines are mounted horizontally, with their blast deflected downward to effect vertical thrust for takeoff. It achieved high subsonic speeds in level flight.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.